The ‘don’t take naked pics if you don’t want them online’ argument is the ‘she was wearing a short skirt’ of the web. Ugh.
Lena Dunham (via shadow-writer)
secondblooms:

To see a world in a grain of sand and heaven in a wild flower Hold infinity in the palms of your hand and eternity in an hour.

William Blake

(Source: divinepics)

followthewestwind:

Lavender by sander123f on Flickr.

OK Go - The Writing’s On the Wall - Official Video

(Source: youtube.com)

September Grass is from James Taylor’s 2002 album entitled October Road.

Paul Joy is a freelance filmmaker/videographer based in Norfolk in the UK.

(Source: youtube.com)

Earth Wind and Fire - September
4,083 plays

the-theme-is:

Artist: Earth, Wind and Fire
Track: September
AlbumThe Best of Earth, Wind & Fire, Volume 1
Year: 1978
Theme: Remembering

(Source: wizardofthewilds)

mamabirdinsj:

thebitchiam:

4gifs:

Puppy growing up, no hesitation on the second jump. [video]

This warms my heart


Cutest thing ever.

mamabirdinsj:

thebitchiam:

4gifs:

Puppy growing up, no hesitation on the second jump. [video]

This warms my heart

Cutest thing ever.

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

thinkmexican:

Emma Tenayuca Organizer: 1916-1999
“I was arrested a number of times. I never thought in terms of fear. I thought in terms of justice.”
Born in 1916 in San Antonio, Texas, Emma Tenayuca lived at a time when Mexican-Americans were allowed few freedoms and fewer privileges. Her close relationship with a grandfather who read the newspapers with her and took her to rallies for the rights of the poor fed the young girl’s profound hunger for both learning and social justice.
At age 16, already determined to challenge injustice, she became involved in community organizing and was jailed and threatened numerous times. In a time when neither Mexican-Americans nor women were expected to speak out, she spoke out fearlessly, and was soon known as a fiery orator and a brilliant organizer.
By age 21, Emma was considered to be the most effective organizer for the National Workers’ Alliance. That same year, 1938, when the wages of the city’s lowest paid workers were cut almost in half, they decided to strike. The city’s 12,000 pecan-shellers, most of them women, elected Emma to lead their strike. In less than two months, the pecan-shellers forced the owners to raise their pay. The Pecan-Shellers’ Strike is considered by many historians to be the first significant victory in the Mexican-American struggle for political and economic equality in this country.
Emma was so articulate and outspoken, that the Workers´ Alliance replaced her when she was 22. There was only so much at that time for a woman — a Mexican woman — to be an ambitious and intellectual champion for justice.
In 1939, as Emma was giving a speech, an enraged mob attacked the San Antonio´s Municipal Auditorium. Fearing that she would be lynched, Emma was led away through a secret passageway. The mob threw bricks, broke windows, set fires, ripped out auditorium seats, and later that night, together with the Ku Klux Klan, burnt the city’s mayor in effigy for having defended Emma’s right to free speech. This event is still on record as the San Antonio’s largest riot.
Read more at AWTT
Teacher Resources: That’s Not Fair! Emma Tenayuca’s Struggle for Justice
Image: “Emma Tenayuca” by Robert Shetterly

thinkmexican:

Emma Tenayuca
Organizer: 1916-1999

“I was arrested a number of times. I never thought in terms of fear. I thought in terms of justice.”

Born in 1916 in San Antonio, Texas, Emma Tenayuca lived at a time when Mexican-Americans were allowed few freedoms and fewer privileges. Her close relationship with a grandfather who read the newspapers with her and took her to rallies for the rights of the poor fed the young girl’s profound hunger for both learning and social justice.

At age 16, already determined to challenge injustice, she became involved in community organizing and was jailed and threatened numerous times. In a time when neither Mexican-Americans nor women were expected to speak out, she spoke out fearlessly, and was soon known as a fiery orator and a brilliant organizer.

By age 21, Emma was considered to be the most effective organizer for the National Workers’ Alliance. That same year, 1938, when the wages of the city’s lowest paid workers were cut almost in half, they decided to strike. The city’s 12,000 pecan-shellers, most of them women, elected Emma to lead their strike. In less than two months, the pecan-shellers forced the owners to raise their pay. The Pecan-Shellers’ Strike is considered by many historians to be the first significant victory in the Mexican-American struggle for political and economic equality in this country.

Emma was so articulate and outspoken, that the Workers´ Alliance replaced her when she was 22. There was only so much at that time for a woman — a Mexican woman — to be an ambitious and intellectual champion for justice.

In 1939, as Emma was giving a speech, an enraged mob attacked the San Antonio´s Municipal Auditorium. Fearing that she would be lynched, Emma was led away through a secret passageway. The mob threw bricks, broke windows, set fires, ripped out auditorium seats, and later that night, together with the Ku Klux Klan, burnt the city’s mayor in effigy for having defended Emma’s right to free speech. This event is still on record as the San Antonio’s largest riot.

Read more at AWTT

Teacher Resources: That’s Not Fair! Emma Tenayuca’s Struggle for Justice

Image: “Emma Tenayuca” by Robert Shetterly

fairy-wren:

(via 500px / Black-throated Trogon (Trogon rufus) by Juan Carlos Vindas)

(Source: vevo.com)

For me, I am driven by two main philosophies: know more today about the world than I knew yesterday and lessen the suffering of others. You’d be surprised how far that gets you.
Neil Degrasse Tyson (via sliceapear)
lonequixote:

The Blue Window ~ Henri Matisse

lonequixote:

The Blue Window ~ Henri Matisse

earthdaily:

The shore of a little paradise by T-20-A-20

earthdaily:

The shore of a little paradise by T-20-A-20

busyreadingerotica:

 

haveigonetoofar:

Don’t Be That Guy.